my heart's in my hand and my hand is pierced, and my hand's in the bag, and the bag is shut, and my heart is caught
       
     
 Taking its title from an incantatory phrase inscribed by the transvestite Divine onto a prison-cell wall in Jean Genet’s  Notre-Dame-des-Fleurs  (1943), the performance concerns itself with Ecstasy—with moments best defined by Michel Leiris in  The Mirror of Tauromachy  as:   a crossroads, an intersection of lines, a bifurcation of trajectories, a hub or wasteland where all comers meet – [...] defined as being 'the tangential point[s] between zero and infinity', so there are, among the countless facts that go to form our universe, different nodes or critical points that might be geometrically depicted as places in which we feel tangential to the world and to ourselves.    Therefore, ecstasy in its most literal sense: to stand outside oneself, to be removed to elsewhere. Ecstasy here radiates of the spiritual and sexual union of God with the saints, of states of oblivion glimpsed in the shade of artificial paradises, of the hypostatic union of man and god/beast * , and the exalting smoke of sorrow and loss. Here beasts are engendered by tangled bodies in constantly shifting shadow and light.
       
     
 Commissioned by the Guggenheim Museum / Works & Process and presented in an evening of works by Andrew Ondrejcak, Derrick Ryan Claud Mitchell, Jason Akira Somma and Marianna Kavallieratos; curated by American director Robert Wilson. 
       
     
  performers  Carlos Soto, Nixon Beltran
       
     
  performer  Andrew Gilchrist
       
     
  performers  Marianna Kavallieratos, Carlos Soto
       
     
  performers  Lynsey Peisinger, Marianna Kavallieratos, Andrew Gilchrist
       
     
  performers  Carlos Soto, Nixon Beltran, Andrew Gilchrist
       
     
       
     
my heart's in my hand and my hand is pierced, and my hand's in the bag, and the bag is shut, and my heart is caught
       
     
my heart's in my hand and my hand is pierced, and my hand's in the bag, and the bag is shut, and my heart is caught

Guggenheim Museum / Works & Process, 2011

with Nixon Beltran, Andrew Gilchrist, Marianna Kavallieratos, Lynsey Peisinger
Carlos Soto
music Michael Galasso
texts Ezra Pound reads Canto II, David Wojnarowicz
movement coach Makram Hamdan
associate designer Mariano Marquez
lighting design Robert Wilson & John Torres
 

 

 Taking its title from an incantatory phrase inscribed by the transvestite Divine onto a prison-cell wall in Jean Genet’s  Notre-Dame-des-Fleurs  (1943), the performance concerns itself with Ecstasy—with moments best defined by Michel Leiris in  The Mirror of Tauromachy  as:   a crossroads, an intersection of lines, a bifurcation of trajectories, a hub or wasteland where all comers meet – [...] defined as being 'the tangential point[s] between zero and infinity', so there are, among the countless facts that go to form our universe, different nodes or critical points that might be geometrically depicted as places in which we feel tangential to the world and to ourselves.    Therefore, ecstasy in its most literal sense: to stand outside oneself, to be removed to elsewhere. Ecstasy here radiates of the spiritual and sexual union of God with the saints, of states of oblivion glimpsed in the shade of artificial paradises, of the hypostatic union of man and god/beast * , and the exalting smoke of sorrow and loss. Here beasts are engendered by tangled bodies in constantly shifting shadow and light.
       
     

Taking its title from an incantatory phrase inscribed by the transvestite Divine onto a prison-cell wall in Jean Genet’s Notre-Dame-des-Fleurs (1943), the performance concerns itself with Ecstasy—with moments best defined by Michel Leiris in The Mirror of Tauromachy as:

a crossroads, an intersection of lines, a bifurcation of trajectories, a hub or wasteland where all comers meet – [...] defined as being 'the tangential point[s] between zero and infinity', so there are, among the countless facts that go to form our universe, different nodes or critical points that might be geometrically depicted as places in which we feel tangential to the world and to ourselves. 

Therefore, ecstasy in its most literal sense: to stand outside oneself, to be removed to elsewhere. Ecstasy here radiates of the spiritual and sexual union of God with the saints, of states of oblivion glimpsed in the shade of artificial paradises, of the hypostatic union of man and god/beast*, and the exalting smoke of sorrow and loss. Here beasts are engendered by tangled bodies in constantly shifting shadow and light.

 Commissioned by the Guggenheim Museum / Works & Process and presented in an evening of works by Andrew Ondrejcak, Derrick Ryan Claud Mitchell, Jason Akira Somma and Marianna Kavallieratos; curated by American director Robert Wilson. 
       
     

Commissioned by the Guggenheim Museum / Works & Process and presented in an evening of works by Andrew Ondrejcak, Derrick Ryan Claud Mitchell, Jason Akira Somma and Marianna Kavallieratos; curated by American director Robert Wilson. 

  performers  Carlos Soto, Nixon Beltran
       
     

performers Carlos Soto, Nixon Beltran

  performer  Andrew Gilchrist
       
     

performer Andrew Gilchrist

  performers  Marianna Kavallieratos, Carlos Soto
       
     

performers Marianna Kavallieratos, Carlos Soto

  performers  Lynsey Peisinger, Marianna Kavallieratos, Andrew Gilchrist
       
     

performers Lynsey Peisinger, Marianna Kavallieratos, Andrew Gilchrist

  performers  Carlos Soto, Nixon Beltran, Andrew Gilchrist
       
     

performers Carlos Soto, Nixon Beltran, Andrew Gilchrist

       
     
Carlos Soto | Watermill Quintet, 2011 | Guggenheim Museum | Works & Process